Schools in Japan will no longer ask you to dye your hair

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On March 10 in Japan, members of the Tokyo Metropolitan Education Board they came together for a regular meeting. Ironically, the main topic of discussion was the repeal of the norm in the city’s higher education institutions. Recently, there has been a growing debate in Japan over whether the time has come to get rid of certain school rules that are still in place in some education centers. The biggest controversy with schools is forcing students to dye their hair black if they have any other natural hair color, to create a uniform look for the students.

Spring is the start of the academic year in Japan, and during the 2021 school year, seven public high schools in Tokyo were still asking students with non-black natural hair to dye their hair black. However, for the forthcoming 2022 school year, the rule has been completely abolished, and is no longer in force in any municipal institution.

Other color related amendment: the 13 institutions that had rules on the color of underwear that students should wear will leave it to the students to decide. The logic behind these rules is that the necessary colors would prevent students’ underwear from being displayed through their uniforms, but the logic was stronger, as long as it is not the clothes are visible, no matter who.

Going back to the hair rules, the 24 schools that banned the “two blocks” cut (so of South Korean idols), in which guys shave their hair to the side and let it grow out on top, got rid of the norm. While the cut split is associated with juveniles, it also has a very common appearance that, as we can attest, does not immediately lead to a life of crime.

Numerically, the biggest change is semantic change, but students will still be happy to see it. A board review of school standards found that 95 schools had ambiguous phrases such as “in a way that suits a high school student”In its transport policies and directives. They have now been modified to better address the specific issue through the use of less arbitrary language.

Policy reform follows an annual review of school policies by the board, which included interviews and discussions with groups of students, educators and parents. «This is a great development, and it is unfortunate that it took so long to come»Confirmed kaori yamaguchimember of education council. Yūto Kitamura echoed this opinion and said: «It is important to maintain an environment in which students can think independently and make their own decisions. I think this is a big step in that direction.».

Source: news24

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